search
date/time
Lancashire Times
Weekend Edition
frontpagebusinessartscarslifestylefamilytravelsportsscitechnaturefictionwhatson
1:15 AM 6th November 2021
nature

Propagating Common Houseplants

Photo by vadim kaipov on Unsplash
Photo by vadim kaipov on Unsplash
Brits are being offered an ultimate guide to creating new plants, from ones which they may already have in their home.

The plant experts at Gardening Express have shared advice on how to propagate common houseplants.

Most of us will be familiar with using seeds, but this isn’t the only method that can be used to fill a home with greenery.

Other easy techniques to grow plants include taking cuttings, dividing the roots, and cutting pups.

Using propagation methods are a great way to save money and boost the number of houseplants kept around the home.

A spokesperson for Gardening Express said:
“Decorating the home with houseplants is a simple way to keep your space looking and feeling fresh.

“A lot of people feel intimidated by this process, as it can be slightly fiddly, but it’s not as hard as you may think”

“Propagating is a great skill to add to your gardening routine, as it will allow you to grow any collection quicker. The beautiful babies you grow will make a great gift or addition to another corner of your home.”


A guide to propagating houseplants by Gardening Express:

Cuttings

Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
Pothos

Pothos plants require little maintenance and will even grow in low light conditions with minimal amounts of water. To propagate, simply identify any healthy stems with four or more leaves on them, use a pair of sharp shears to cut below the root node at an angle and place in some water.

Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
Heartleaf philodendron

This houseplant is super easy to care for. All it needs is a bit of indirect sunlight and it can be grown in soil or just water. Remove any stem that is three to six inches long and get rid of all the leaves attached to it. Once ready to get growing, place it in water or moist houseplant soil and watch the plant bloom from a stem.

Image by Jan Haerer from Pixabay
Image by Jan Haerer from Pixabay
Jade plant

For better and faster results, the Jade plant should be propagated during warmer months. Once you have your clipping, place it in some moist soil in a small container. Gardeners can speed up the process, by dipping the cutting into a rooting hormone before placing it in the soil.

Root Division

Photo by Jake Goossen on Unsplash
Photo by Jake Goossen on Unsplash
Snake plant

The snake plant is typically easy to care for. All it needs is a bit of water once the soil starts to look dry. To propagate, take the Snake Plant out of its pot and find a stem that is attached to the main part of the plant, then carefully pull at the stem to separate the roots. If the process is proving a bit tough, a knife can be used. Once the stem is separate, simply re-pot it.

Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
Photo by Severin Candrian on Unsplash
ZZ plant

The quickest and easiest method to propagate a ZZ plant is through root division. This plant will flourish in indirect sunlight with water needed every two to three weeks. Again, the roots will need to be separated carefully and then, the plant can then be re-potted.

Image by inonoyazy from Pixabay
Image by inonoyazy from Pixabay
Boston fern

A Boston fern should be watered around twice a week to keep the soil nice and moist. If the roots are divided by hand, the propagated part of the plant can be placed directly into a houseplant soil. However, if a knife was used, it will need a few days for the cut to heal

Pups

Photo by Maja Dumat
Photo by Maja Dumat
Ponytail palm

Plants that produce pups to propagate do most of the regrowing themselves. The Ponytail palm is an extremely forgiving plant. They are happy in low light, however, the brighter places they are kept, the better. Soil should be left to dry significantly in between watering. Let the pup grow a few inches in size on the plant and then simply cut them off and re-pot.

Photo by PINKE
Photo by PINKE
Bromeliad

The same rules apply when dealing with bromeliad pups. Allow them to grow to a few inches before cutting off and re-potting. This plant requires slightly more maintenance and should be kept moist in direct sun and in a light, airy setting.

https://www.gardeningexpress.co.uk/